BUILDING SOCIAL SKILLS

BUILDING SOCIAL SKILLS

Many kids worry about whether they’ll ever be able to hang out with their friends again. When we can’t be social, how do we practice social skills? And what can we do for children who, because of developmental differences, were already struggling socially? Here are a few exercises to build important social skills
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Self Injury How To Stop This Dangerous Practice

Self Injury How To Stop This Dangerous Practice

Many wonder why anyone would practice self-injury, as it is painful and dangerous. However, with autistic children, self-injury occurs more often than not. There are several theories as to why this practice can be prevalent in autistic children, and there are some methods you can use to help ease this distressing practice.
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Doctors And Diagnosing Autism

Doctors And Diagnosing Autism

When a doctor first suggests that your child has autism, your immediate reaction might be disbelief and the urge to seek a second, third, or even fourth opinion. Because autism is so different in every child, it is a tricky disorder to diagnose.
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9 THINGS SPECIAL NEEDS PARENTS FEEL GUILTY ABOUT (AND HOW TO STOP)

9 THINGS SPECIAL NEEDS PARENTS FEEL GUILTY ABOUT (AND HOW TO STOP)

Special needs parents carry a lot of guilt. We have a lot on our plates and it can be very hard to juggle all of it and still feel like a human being. While guilt is certainly a part of life, we certainly shouldn’t let it run or ruin our life. Here are 9 solutions to some of the most common things special needs parents feel guilty about.
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As most people know, stuttering is a communication disorder that involves an interruption of the continuous flow of speech. Characterized by prolonged sounds, repetitions of words or phrases, frequent filler words like “uh” and “um,” and silence or verbal

Why kids stutter and what to do about it

As most people know, stuttering is a communication disorder that involves an interruption of the continuous flow of speech. Characterized by prolonged sounds, repetitions of words or phrases, frequent filler words like “uh” and “um,” and silence or verbal struggling before saying a word, stuttering is often accompanied by secondary behaviors, such as avoidance of eye contact or awkward movements of arms or legs to force out words. What people may not realize is that the disorder is cyclical in nature and symptoms can vary over time.
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